Life Lesson

Discovering Your Cultural Fit

Cultural Fit_Part 3 - edited-1_edited-3

Whether you are currently employed or a candidate job searching, it’s easy to fall into the trap of “just wanting a job and one that pays well”, as the primary goal. Making sure that the company cultural fit is a match for you, however, can be critical for your long-term career aspirations and success.

Today, companies look for skill and experience as well as how employees and candidates fit their company culture. When hiring, Cultural Fit Interview Questions by Workable.com, provides an excellent summary PDF for employers to understand cultural match. And, as this article notes, “Candidates also have a say in whether they’ll fit well with your company.” For this reason, applicants should understand the cultural fit that best meets their needs in order to thrive. Therefore, Cultural Fit Interview Questions is an effective tool for candidates, too. In addition, a list of questions are noted below for job seekers, whether currently employed and feel as if you are swimming in static waters or for those unemployed and actively interviewing; workforce veteran or college grad. After working through the lists, job seekers will hopefully come away with a good grasp about corporate culture, style and fit.

Once you have concluded the personality of the company and how they “roll”, make a decision if the company is a match for you and stick with it. Not every item on your list will be checked, so know where you are willing to make compromises. Make sure you are comfortable with your future team and your direct report is excited to have you on-board. Anything less is a red flag!

How should you respond if a job is offered and you are filled with uncertainty and you notice red flags? Bring up your concerns. How much of your concern is angst and how many apprehensions are valid, which hopefully can be worked through? Having said this, I know someone who had a number of concerns joining a company based on a level of discomfort and red flags. After discussing these concerns with a few employees, this individual was assured worries were unfounded. But, the executive director’s excitement did not appear to be authentic. The job lasted 29 days. Like a marriage, people show their best before the “ceremony” and any quirks become magnified after the honeymoon is over. Every situation is different and I share this story because the last thing anyone wants… a job that requires constantly having to look over the shoulder sensing that “something” is just not right! This then becomes a working environment not conducive to success, blocking the ability for anyone to thrive; the employee, team, department and company.

If you are employed and suddenly terminated without explanation and specifics, other than being told “not a cultural fit”, there can be an overwhelming feeling of injustice and mistreatment leading to suspicion of unlawful termination. At this point there might not be an opportunity to filter through work emails and forward accolades to your personal email. You could be immediately cutoff from the company server if working from home or escorted out of the office by security. It’s in the best interest of every employee to FORWARD emails to a personal account and SAVE all positive correspondence and performance reviews. Journaling direct report meetings and conversations is a good idea, as well. To pursue legal steps you may need all relevant documentation to prove unlawful termination.

How to identify corporate personal bias? Suspicion happens most often when the culture of a company is not documented and executive leadership can’t explain why someone is not a cultural fit, either passed up for hire or an employee is terminated suddenly. “It is an incredibly vague term and it’s a vague term often based on gut instinct,” says Wharton management professor Katherine Klein, Vice Dean of the Wharton Social Impact Initiative. “The biggest problem is that while we invoke cultural fit as a reason to hire someone, it is far more common to use it to not hire someone.  People can’t tell you what aspect of the culture they are worried about.” Is Cultural Fit a Qualification for Hiring or a Disguise for Bias? 

An employee wrongfully terminated can independently seek legal counsel or file a complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. This would especially be necessary if you believe termination may come under any one of the federal protected classes.

Employers can and should use cultural fit as an effective means of bridging diversity with the values and beliefs needed to successfully achieve corporate vision. As an employee, the steps you take to determine cultural fit in an organization is equally your responsibility as it is the company hiring. This all becomes tricky when companies loosely wave this term around without having a documented description of “corporate culture” defined along with its connection to strategic business goals. Hopefully, by properly understanding the term cultural fit, employers and employees can reduce the risk of personal bias and discriminatory masking. Be proactive as a corporation and define your corporate culture! As a potential or existing employee, know your cultural fit!

Discover Your Cultural Fit – Questions

Describe your ideal job. What qualities do you need to flourish?

Describe the ideal company for you.  

  • Industry/field
  • Large, medium, small?
  • Start up company?
  • Company ramping up growth?
  • Well-established and structured company?
  • Specific company names? (Although these companies may not be hiring, you can use the names noted to gauge similar companies.)

Describe your successful working habits?

  • Alone and focused
  • Team player and interactive
  • Structured
  • Entrepreneurial spirit

Describe your ideal working environment?

  • Location (big city, suburban campus, or, work remotely from home)
  • Quiet and subdued
  • Busy, interactive, and not quiet
  • Offices and/or cubicles
  • Open concept with desks
  • Work remotely from home, always or part time

How does the working environment feel to you?

  • Upbeat, energetic, loud
  • Serious and quite
  • Stressful
  • People interacting or primarily working alone?
  • Open or closed office doors?
  • Do you feel like your input would be valued and respected?

Prepare For The Interview

  • Be prepared. Know in advance how you might be interviewed. Internet search and find articles describing current interview trends. Below are two articles about interviews where the term “cultural fit” is used.

Three Ways to Know if An Employee Is A Cultural Fit? By Jeff Pruitt, Chairman and CEO, Tallwave, published INC.com, How To Hire The Best,

Cultural Fit Interview Questions by Workable.com

Interview Questions To Ask The Interviewee

Describe the ideal candidate for this job?

  • Education
  • Skill
  • Experience
  • Personality
  • Works independently or part of a team?

Describe the culture of your organization?

  • Describe an employee(s) who you feel is a great cultural fit and why you feel this way?
  • If a candidate or employee is not a cultural fit, what three traits would bring you to this conclusion?

What traits or working habits do you feel would not be a good cultural fit for this position?

  • If this question cannot be answered directly and adequately in the interview process, and you notice a wide gap differential when comparing yourself and the current employees of the firm, this may not be the company for you.

“The only way that culture in the workplace is effective is if there are sets of values that help the company achieve its strategy,” Barsade notes. “When there is thoughtfulness around what the values are and you tie that to hiring, then you have best hiring practices.” Is Cultural Fit a Qualification for Hiring or a Disguise for Bias? Knowledge@Wharton, Management

Are performance reviews conducted, and if so, how often?

  • Is cultural fit a part of the job interview?

Is it possible for this job to move into other promotable positions? Or, are you looking to fill this position as a steady long-term role?

  • Is this position replacing someone who resigned or one who has been promoted?

 

Resources

Cultural Fit Interview Questions by Workable.com
Is Cultural Fit a Qualification for Hiring or a Disguise for Bias? Knowledge@Wharton, Management, July 16, 2015
Three Ways to Know if An Employee Is A Cultural Fit? By Jeff Pruitt, Chairman and CEO, Tallwave, published INC.com, How To Hire The Best, August 12, 2016
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission –  Filing a Complaint
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission – Protected Classes